Scientific Steering Group

Nathalie Voisin, Co-Chair
Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Dr. Voisin’s research focuses on better understanding and predicting the inter-dependencies between land-water systems’ resilience and power systems’ resilience toward identifying vulnerabilities and opportunities in joint operations and planning under compounded short and long term stressors (climate extremes, water availability, market fluctuations, technology innovations, etc). Approaches include improving the representation of hydro-climate constraints and opportunities in power system models, improving the prediction of climate-water-land processes leading to critical sensitivities in power system models, and coupling climate, hydrology and water resources management models with power system models across spatial and temporal scales.
Website: https://hydrology.pnnl.gov/staff/staff_info.asp?staff_num=2203

Klaus Keller, Co-Chair
Penn State University

Dr. Keller’s research addresses two interrelated questions. First, how can we mechanistically understand past and potentially predict future changes in the Earth system? Second, how can we use this information to design sustainable, scientifically sound, technologically feasible, economically efficient, and ethically defensible risk management strategies? He analyzes these questions by mission-oriented basic research covering a wide range of disciplines such as Earth system science, economics, engineering, philosophy, decision science, and statistics. 
Website: https://www.geosc.psu.edu/~kzk10

Jordan Macknick, Member At-large
National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL)

Jordan’s research explores the co-evolution of the energy sector alongside water resource, climate, land-use, and agricultural dynamics. Using interdisciplinary approaches and models that span multiple sectors, Macknick analyzes national and regional implications of different energy pathways in the context of water and land resource constraints, evaluates opportunities to improve the energy management and resilience of water infrastructure, and explores innovative approaches to integrating renewable energy and agricultural operations.
Website: https://www.nrel.gov/water/integrated-water-systems.html

Jennifer Morris, Member At-large
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Dr. Morris’ research focuses on uncertainty analysis, energy-economic modeling and coupled human-natural systems. Her uncertainty-related work involves uncertainty quantification, risk assessment and applying different approaches to represent uncertainties in models and explore how they impact near-term decisions. A key focus is investment planning for energy, water and coastal adaptation. Using multi-region, multi-sector human system modeling frameworks, she also develops integrated economic and climate scenarios, examines regional and sectoral dynamics, explores energy transitions and economic development pathways, and investigates avenues for incorporating climate impacts into human system models.
Website: https://globalchange.mit.edu/about-us/personnel/morris-jennifer

Megan Konar, Member At-large
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Megan Konar is an assistant professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her group conducts policy-relevant research that focuses on the intersection of water, food, and trade. Her research is interdisciplinary, drawing from hydrology, environmental science, and economics. To pursue her research questions, her group uses a range of quantitative tools, such as data analytics, network analysis, and econometrics.
Website: http://mkonar.cee.illinois.edu

Jim Yoon, Working Group representative
Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Dr. Yoon’s research focuses on the development and application of advanced modeling and simulation techniques to understand and evaluate coupled human-natural systems, identifying solutions that can enhance system sustainability, equity, and resilience under changing climate and socioeconomic conditions. He has a particular interest in utilizing agent-based models to represent human adaptation, ranging broadly from individual consumer choices to institutional change, in integrated water system models. 
Website: https://energyenvironment.pnnl.gov/staff/staff_info.asp?staff_num=3295

Casey Burleyson, Working Group representative
Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Dr. Casey Burleyson is a research scientist at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A meteorologist by training, Casey currently works on a broad range of topics ranging from understanding the factors that control cloud formation and organization to simulating climate and population impacts on regional building energy demand. He is an advocate for the emerging trend of open data and software in the scientific community. Casey has contributed to the adoption of an open data repository for PNNL and is leading the development of a collaborative data platform for the MultiSector Dynamics community within DOE.
Website: https://www.pnnl.gov/science/staff/staff_info.asp?staff_num=8073

Facilitation Team

Richard Moss
Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Dr. Moss’ research focuses on the role of human agency and decision making in the co-evolution of coupled human-natural systems and factors that facilitate or limit interdisciplinary scientific collaboration. Current projects include evaluation of scientific information to support coastal disaster recovery planning, work he is conducting while on a leave of absence from PNNL at the Andlinger Center at Princeton University. In addition to his academic work, Richard has held a number of public service positions in government and non-governmental organizations.
Website: https://www.pnnl.gov/science/staff/staff_info.asp?staff_num=5688

Patrick Reed
Cornell University

Dr. Reed’s research bridges sustainability science, risk management, operations research, and artificial intelligence. His Decision Analytics in Complex Systems research group is exploring new frameworks for effectively combining a wide range of knowledge sources with simulation, optimization, and information technologies to capture impacted systems’ governing processes, elucidate human and ecologic risks, limit management costs, and satisfy conflicting performance objectives. The software tools developed by Dr. Reed combine multiobjective optimization, high performance computing, and advanced spatiotemporal visualization and uncertainty modeling techniques.
Website: http://reed.cee.cornell.edu

Antonia Hadjimichael
Cornell University

Dr. Hadjimichael is a postdoctoral associate at the Reed Group at Cornell University. Her research applies exploratory modeling, diagnostics, and multi-objective evolutionary optimization to inform planning for water resources systems under uncertainty. She is also interested in advancing model- and simulation-based decision analytics to improve our understanding of system interactions and dynamics.
Website: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=xrvxn-sAAAAJ

Erwan Monier
University of California, Davis

Dr. Monier’s research explores the climate change and extreme weather impacts to various sectors of the economy and ecosystem services, including agriculture, terrestrial ecosystem health and wildfires. His Global Environmental Change research group applies interdisciplinary approaches to examine the co-evolution of human and natural systems in the face of global environmental change and to build the next generation of tools to explore the dynamics of the energy-water-land system and the interactions among climate, air quality and health.
Website: http://globalchange.ucdavis.edu

Shuaiqi Wu
University of California, Davis

Shuaiqi Wu is a Ph.D. student in the Atmospheric Science Graduate Group with the focus in climate change effects on agriculture. He is interested in studying extreme events, water scarcity, global warming, and other adverse consequences resulting from global climate change to investigate their impacts on crop yields as well as livestock and planting industry. He expects to extend his research from regional scale to global scale for global food security and economies which heavily depends on the first industry.